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Difference between A/B testing and Multivariate testing

It’s been a while, so in the meantime I’ve found this quite useful as we are look to start introducing this within my streams of work!


Many people seem to get confused about the terms A/B testing, split testing and multivariate testing. Essentially, A/B testing and split testing are the same concepts but multivariate testing is different. So for all practical concepts, consider A/B Testing = Split Testing. The difference between A/B testing (or split testing) and Multivariate Testing:

A/B Testing


In A/B testing you split traffic amongst two or more completely different versions of a webpage (landing page, home page, etc.) The variations of your original page can differ in any manner. You can either just change the headline; or you can even change entire design, layout, offer and what not in the variations. What you change in A/B test is only limited by your creativity. For example, if you are A/B testing on your landing page you may want to create one version with 15% discount, the other with free shipping and one with the same offer but different page design.





Really useful for testing radically different ideas for conversion rate optimization.


Multivariate Testing

In multivariate test, you identify a few key areas/sections of a page and then create variations for those sections specifically (as opposed to creating variations of whole page in an A/B split test). So for example, in multivariate test you can choose to create different variations for 2 different sections: headline and image. A multivariate testing will combine all these section specific variations to generate unique versions of page to be tested and then simply split traffic amongst those versions. That is, you will get these variations of the page: Headline1_Image1, Headline1_Image2, Headline2_Image1, Headline2_Image2.






Really useful for optimizing and refining an existing landing page or homepage without doing significant investment in redesign.

I hope that was a good comparison between A/B testing and multivariate testing. If you think I left any point, please let me know. I will update the comparison table accordingly.

Blog post from:
https://vwo.com/blog/difference-ab-testing-multivariate-testing/

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