Skip to main content

10 Basic rules for beginners in automation!


Testing is a hard task and automating it is a dream of every tester or developer. However, automation requires deep understanding of the process and constant practice along with following basic guidelines. We will describe these guidelines in this article to show you automation is done easily when done right.

Rule 1: Read the basics and learn them

Even skilled developers need to revise their knowledge from time to time, learning is a must. Automation is nothing but a mere evaluation of steps the program must perform, writing a detailed instruction.

Rule 2: Be prepared to meet the automation project

Practice is the only way to get valid knowledge. Grab any open source testing tool available, install it and learn using it in your free time. The sandbox may be anything, even your MS Office or Calculator tool. Just get the tool and get started, gain understanding and experience to be ready to facing the real project when need be.

Rule 3: Basic concepts are the same, just explore them

Apart from different peculiarities all coding languages basically operate the same concepts like variables, parameters, functions, different data types, loop or conditional statements, arrays, etc. After having these understood and remembered, you will be able to apply this knowledge to any coding language. Spare some time, a couple of weeks maybe on understanding the brick stones the code consists of.

Rule 4: Do not stop after the first program fail

Russians have a wonderful proverb: the first pancake is a mess. It means first try on anything will most likely fail, but all the next ones will be better, as you will gain experience in the process. No matter how good you are on theory, first practice likely will be disappointing. So just go on.

Rule 5: Look on code as a procedure, not a magic

Whenever beginner looks at the code, it seems nearly unbelievably complex. However, after doing some coding you will be able to recognize patterns and procedures at once, making reading the code much easier. You will see it is merely an instruction for the program, written as clear as it can be to avoid any mischief.

Rule 6: Explore the tool

The best way to get used to a tool is exploring its features one by one. Start with File section and click every menu, sub-menu and drop-down item all the way to Help section. Most of the items will have self-explanatory names and you will see what the others do.

Rule 7: Search for help in Help section

Whenever you are stuck feel free to read Help section of the tool. It is a wonderful source full of explanations and instructions upon every aspect of the tool’s usage. Explore it thoroughly to master the tool perfectly.

Rule 8: Practice a lot

Keep in mind testing as a validation process. It allows you to conclude if the code is functional or not. Your testing automation should be able to do the same thing, so make sure it does not give the raw results, but the clear answer: yes or no, test passed or failed.

Rule 9: Improve your work

All things done well can be done even better. Revising and striving to improve your projects is a way to improving your skills and driving you on to new heights.

Rule 10: Automation is not always needed

Despite being so useful, automation is nothing more than a tool for a tester. Really skilled testers do not need it as can read the code easily and resolve the bugs on sight. Decide the way of actions on every particular case and use manual testing or automation if needed.

Conclusion:

Those rules are not obligatory, yet they are simple and obvious. Following them will help you improving your skills and becoming a better tester.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

My Testbash Brighton 2017 Notes

This was my second Testbash... if you ever get the chance in the future these conferences are a must!
I took copious amounts of notes from the 9 talks and tried to highlight my key takeaways here... hope they make sense but please comment if you have any questions :-)
Amy Phillips - Continuous Delivery
A survival guide to joining a fast paced environment/project…
Where does testing fit within Continuous delivery:


As highlighted, basically from start to finish…
There are lots of things we can do when joining a project that is using Continuous Delivery but one of the main points from this talk was to do your research! There should be an element of "Continuous" in every aspect of the project.
·Learning the ling, what's the difference Continuous Delivery, Continuous Deployment, Continuous Integration, Continuous design, Continuous Improvements etc.? ·Understand what your role in the project is going to be ·Understand the teams values, What's going well and maybe what the team p…

Is TestBash an Invaluable experience?

Over the last few years, I’ve attended four single track conferences at TestBash Brighton and Manchester. Most recently, September 2018 and April 2019.

One of the most common questions I get after the conference is, Was it worth it? Especially now given, I’m a contractor, and I attend at my own expense.

In short, Yes It’s definitely worth the trip!

That leads me into my question; does a single-track conference work for me, or could I get more out of TestBash?

Of course, there are pros and cons, some talks may not be as engaging, but this is no disrespect to the speakers, for me, it’s because I probably favour certain subjects and I’m pretty sure others will think the same.

Do I make the most of what’s on offer at TestBash? It pains me to say, No! I don’t make the most of the events leading up to and post the single-track conference so I could get more from the week.

TestBash offers master classes on automation. A full day of workshops. Test.bash() with talks on automation and technica…

The way we work shouldn’t be ‘Alien’ anymore, Should it!?!?

It’s been a good while since I have written anything (Mainly because I’m not that good a writer) but given my 16 months in the public sector I thought it was time… 
For a good number of years now the DevOps trend has given rise of buzzwords and methods aiming to speed delivery and it’s now an assumption of mine that most organisations are au fait with the term ‘Continuous Delivery’.
I was wrong…
Within the organisation that I am currently placed I believe I have a high-functioning collaborative team who work flexibly and in continuous cycle. We also involve the users which is a huge benefit to the development teams, but that’s not saying we get everything right 100% of the time! Teams must continue to learn and evolve to remain productive.
Our team work in one of several delivery groups and with this comes multiple challenges; Silos No single environment strategy lack of communicationsVaried ways of working.  And thats just to name a few, which is interesting when all delivery groups …